"News is the first rough draft of history."

The Voice of the College at Florham

"News is the first rough draft of history." - The Voice of the College at Florham

Short story: Darkness falls following prom night

CHRIS BEDELL
Staff Writer

Just because people have a romanticized version of prom, doesn’t mean that it isn’t magical.
It was six o’clock in the evening. I stood in my room while I got dolled up.
I dashed over to the mirror that hung on my bedroom wall above my ivory dresser. I smiled as soon as I saw myself. My long curly locks had just been re-bleached to a fabulous shade of platinum blonde. I moved my arms in front of the mirror as my eyes dropped down to my black nail polish on my fingernails. I then moved my hands to my dress to make sure everything was fine. Call it OCD, or anxiety, but I would be damned if I had a wardrobe malfunction. My eyes held a gaze with the mirror. The dress was fine. It was a black strapless dress. I liked it the second that I saw it at the local boutique shop on Main Street. My mother hated it. I suppose she thought that it was too morbid – not that I cared.
I licked my lips a little the minute they were stained in a black color. The black lipstick was a perfect match for my black dress. The gothic undertone to my prom style was marvelous. I was just drawn to darkness… Continue reading

Short story: A complicated past in a small town

CHRIS BEDELL
Staff Writer

A gust of wind howled in the background as Liam walked up to the bar. He was currently standing on the massive acres of the Ridge Brook Country Club. It was the annual Founder’s Day Party. Liam grabbed a pre poured glass of champagne that was on the bar counter. The liquid fell into his mouth as a burning sensation pricked his throat. It wasn’t long before the alcohol trickled down into his stomach. A scorching sensation lingered for another moment. Continue reading

Personal essay: Student reflects on an emotional summer

CHRIS BEDELL
Staff Writer

It was Friday, May 23, 2014. I had been home from Fairleigh Dickinson University for over a week. My dad and I sat in chairs in my mom’s hospital room. Her latest visit to hell was due to a combination of factors related to her declining health.
A woman in a white lab coat shuffled into the room. I knew who it was immediately.
After a minute or two of general conversation about how my mom felt that day, it was time for my mom’s oncologist to have “the talk.”
“I think that it’s time to stop treatment,” she said. “You are getting all of the nasty side effects of the chemo but none of the benefits. It’s time to focus on getting you home and having hospice.” Continue reading

The Wroxton experience: The hardest part is coming home

CHRISTI PEACE
Editor-in-Chief

Flying on a commercial flight for the first time in my life was an incredible way to begin my journey at Wroxton. I sat next to a fellow student, and as we took off, he and I stared out the window until the ground was thousands of feet away. As the flight progressed and the world turned pitch black around us, I was able to see more stars than I had ever seen before in my life thanks to the utter darkness of the ocean.
That was only one of the many firsts I would have on my trip. Continue reading

From the editor’s desk: It’s never easy saying goodbye

MONIQUE T. VITCHE
Editor-in-Chief

I honestly have no idea what I’m doing with my life, but I better figure it out quickly because I’m graduating at the end of this semester.

Although I am relieved to be graduating in February so there is (hopefully) less competition in the job market, I’m actually sad about it. I’m not exactly ready to leave FDU and The Pillar just yet.

I think part of it has to do with the fact that I didn’t start at FDU right away. I’ve been to two other colleges/universities since I graduated high school in 2009.

I began my undergraduate studies at a small liberal arts college in Virginia, but I wasn’t happy. During my semester and three weeks at the college, I realized it wasn’t for me. It was too cliquey and reminded me of high school. I didn’t enjoy middle and high school, and I thought if I went to school in New Jersey that I’d be with the same people I went to school with for seven years, so I started looking into colleges out-of-state.

Little did I know, the “right” place for me was just 40 minutes away from my house this entire time.
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Opinion: America and the enduring Kennedy mystique

AYINDE J. STEVENS
Student Voice Editor

This Friday will mark the 50th anniversary of the John Fitzgerald Kennedy’s assassination. The assassination, which took place in Dallas, was one of the most damaging events of 20th century.

A whole generation that looked up to Kennedy and, by extension, his family, when he was sworn in in January of 1961, had their heads bowed in grief two years later.
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Opinion: It’s important to look beyond the macro level of oppression

DEVON DOUGLAS-BOWERS
Staff Writer

Sexism, racism, homophobia and transphobia are all something that most of us have learned about or are currently in the process of learning.

While it is important to learn about these different forms of oppression, we must also take into account from what perspective we are taught about oppression and how it is rather incomplete. Rarely, if ever, do we discuss oppression in a personal manner, from how it affects us on an individual level to how we perpetuate systems of oppression through our thoughts and actions.
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Opinion: Why Congress needs to complete ENDA’s passage

AYINDE J. STEVENS
Student Voice Editor

Last week, the U.S. Senate made a bold statement in passing the Employment Non-Discrimination Act, or ENDA. The bill, which passed with a vote of 64 to 32, with 10 Republicans from states ranging from Nevada to New Hampshire, is the latest step in the multi-decade push for equality within the LGBT community.

The bill will make it illegal to discriminate in the workplace against someone who is either Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual or Transgender.
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From the editor’s desk: Things change, but I’m okay with that

MONIQUE T. VITCHE
Editor-in-Chief

The majority of the time I have difficulty expressing myself, which is probably a bad thing since I am a writer. Maybe it’s the sleep deprivation that’s making it so difficult.

Or maybe I just don’t enjoy it anymore.

A lot of things have changed in the last year that I often blame as my reason for not writing as often as I used to, outside of reporting or writing poems for my poetry class.

It’s a strange feeling when people all but disappear from your life. When it happens gradually, you almost don’t notice it, but when it happens instantaneously you feel as though you’re alone in the middle of a ghost town at night. Maybe that’s just me who feels that way. There’s only so many one-sided conversations you can possibly have.

I came across a quotation that probably sums it up better than I possibly could. In “Cakes and Ale: Or, the Skeleton in the Cupboard,” W. Somerset Maugham wrote, “It’s no good trying to keep up old friendships. It’s painful for both sides. The fact is, one grows out of people, and the only thing is to face it.”
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