"News is the first rough draft of history."

The Voice of the College at Florham

"News is the first rough draft of history." - The Voice of the College at Florham

Opinion: America and the enduring Kennedy mystique

AYINDE J. STEVENS
Student Voice Editor

This Friday will mark the 50th anniversary of the John Fitzgerald Kennedy’s assassination. The assassination, which took place in Dallas, was one of the most damaging events of 20th century.

A whole generation that looked up to Kennedy and, by extension, his family, when he was sworn in in January of 1961, had their heads bowed in grief two years later.
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Opinion: Why Congress needs to complete ENDA’s passage

AYINDE J. STEVENS
Student Voice Editor

Last week, the U.S. Senate made a bold statement in passing the Employment Non-Discrimination Act, or ENDA. The bill, which passed with a vote of 64 to 32, with 10 Republicans from states ranging from Nevada to New Hampshire, is the latest step in the multi-decade push for equality within the LGBT community.

The bill will make it illegal to discriminate in the workplace against someone who is either Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual or Transgender.
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Personal essay: A warm welcome back to Halloween

AYINDE J. STEVENS
Student Voice Editor

Now I know that it seems odd to be talking about Halloween in November, but for the past two years we have been tricked rather than treated to a normal Halloween by Mother Nature. Between “Snowtober” and Superstorm Sandy, which also came with a snowstorm, it seemed as if the Eastern Seaboard was cursed.

If it happened again this year I could imagine the Halloween spirit being so crushed it would take another generation just to get it back.
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Florham Programming Committee revives Haunted Mansion event

AYINDE J. STEVENS
Student Voice Editor

After a hiatus, the Florham Programming Committee was finally able to resurrect the Haunted Mansion for Halloween on Oct. 30. The Haunted Mansion, a long standing tradition on the College at Florham campus, was cancelled twice in the last two years due to inclement weather conditions. But this year, the weather held up.

The Haunted Mansion involves Greek organizations and club members taking over entire rooms inside the Mansion and creating their own theme or dramatic presentation in order to try to win a cash prize. Then, students are brought in to travel through the Mansion with tour guides leading them to each room. This year, however, some of the tour guides were actually in character themselves.
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Lhota and de Blasio run for the ‘second toughest job in America’

AYINDE STEVENS
Student Voice Editor

It is perhaps the most sought after office in the land after the presidency. It deals with eight million constituents and 51 council members, appoints seven deputy mayors, contends with a $70 billion annual budget and a myriad of unions and requires being New York City’s biggest cheerleader. Not to mention that it means being called “hizzoner” in the press.

In November, New Yorkers will vote for their next mayor. In the Republican corner is Joseph Lhota, the former head of the Metropolitan Transit Authority (MTA), the authority that everyone loves to hate while relying on it every day. In the Democratic corner is Bill de Blasio, coming from the office of Public Advocate, the office few people know about.
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Review: ‘The Cuckoo’s Calling’

AYINDE J. STEVENS
Student Voice Editor

By now we all know the story about how J.K. Rowling managed to pull herself out of what she considered rock-bottom to become one of the wealthiest women in the world – all with the idea of a skinny kid who has magical powers.

Rowling has continued her success with her new novel, “The Cuckoo’s Calling.”
The novel, which takes place in contemporary London, has Detective Cormoran Strike looking into the suicide of Lula “Cuckoo” Landry, a supermodel whose death even had, hypothetically, the BBC talking about it. Landry’s adoptive brother, John, asks Strike to take up the case, utterly convinced it was murder.
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Personal Essay: Thank Heavens for Friday miracles

AYINDE J. STEVENS
Student Voice Editor

If it happens on a Friday, it is some of the best news around.

First, I found out about the exclusive interview Pope Francis gave to a Jesuit publication declaring that the Catholic Church should stop having a laser focus on gay marriage, contraception and abortion. I mean, talk about left field. I knew His Holiness was cool but I didn’t know that he would be that cool.

Granted, I’m quite aware that the Church won’t start performing gay marriages and opening up women’s health clinics anytime soon, His Holiniess is telling both the Curia (Catholic church hierarchy) and ourselves that we shouldn’t be judging ourselves for who we are, what we did or what we believe in its about being a good human being, all of which are the best attributes of any religion.
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Comedian explains how to get high, without needing drugs

AYINDE J. STEVENS
Student Voice Editor

On Thursday, September 26, the New Social Engine (NSE) held an event called “How to Get High Naturally” discussing alternative ways to abusing drugs and alcohol. The event’s name was based off the title of the first chapter in comedian Matt Bellace’s book, “A Better High.” Just like in his book, Bellace explained to the attendees how you can truly get high without using substances such as marijuana, alcohol, cocaine, or any other forms of self-destructive behavior.

The event took place in the Rutherford Room in the Ferguson Recreation Center. Bellace came to speak to students about safer ways to get high based on his experiences not only as a comedian and author, but a clinical psychologist and the inspiration for NSE as well. The NSE itself is a club dedicated to providing substance-free fun for students and invited Bellace to come host the event for the fifth time at the Florham campus.
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Personal essay: Observations from an ever-changing NYC

AYINDE J. STEVENS
Student Voice Editor

They say summer in New York City is like no other, but it certainly has changed since “Do the Right Thing” came out all those years ago.

Sure, tensions do flare at times and there still is the occasional “hot car” still slinking in the subway, but as summer has now come to a close and the last rays have been soaked up before the temperature begins to slide as the sun retreats from this part of the world, I wonder if this summer was actually worth repeating.

After all, it rained almost through most of June and then came the heat in July for the first half and then it plunged the second half to the unheard of temperature of 76 degrees and little humidity.

The humidity, which is what makes this city sizzle and pop during this time, made the city seem to be, well, civil.
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Review: Wecker brings ‘Old New York’ to life with first book

AYINDE J. STEVENS
Student Voice Editor

Helene Wecker’s debut novel “The Golem and the Jinni,” takes readers back to a period in New York’s history when “whole nations are packed into the space of a few blocks,” with a supernatural twist.

The novel takes place in the fading gaslight world of nineteenth century New York, a period when thousands upon thousands people poured into cities of cramped tenements and sweatshops, all looking to secure the promise that was America. The setting proves to be the backdrop of a sweeping story revolving around the arrival of two supernatural creatures, themselves strangers in a strange land where even for them nothing is what it seems.

The Golem, Chava, which means life in Hebrew, arrives in New York from Danzig after being created by the mystical and devious Yehudah Schaalman by the dark Kabbalistic arts.
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