"News is the first rough draft of history."

The Voice of the College at Florham

"News is the first rough draft of history." - The Voice of the College at Florham

FDU alumnus speaks with students about public relations

CHRISTI PEACE
News Editor

Alumni of a college can be a helpful resource in providing information and advice to current students. On Thursday, Nov. 21, FDU alumnus Michael Sinatra came to the College at Florham campus to speak with undergraduates in a public relations class about his experience in the working world.

Having earned his degree in communication studies in 2006, he has made a career practicing PR. He is currently a public relations and public affairs manager and directs the PR for the Northeast region of Whole Foods Market.

He began by explaining the history of the organization, stating that Whole Foods has more than 365 stores throughout the United Kingdom, U.S. and Canada.

His job is to serve as a spokesperson, handle media relations, crises and more within his region. This includes New York, which he called the media capital of the world.
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New program promotes university’s global mission

CHRISTI PEACE
News Editor

Fairleigh Dickinson University is “dedicated to the preparation of world citizens through global education,” according to the FDU website. Last year, the Global Engagement program (GEO) was created to promote the global mission among undergraduates throughout the school.

It is based on a points system where students participate in relevant activities to be able to reach the level necessary to acquire a certificate of completion.
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Panelists debate controversial U.S. policy on immigration

CHRISTI PEACE
News Editor

Immigration in the United States has been a subject of controversy for hundreds of years. Whether it be targeting specific groups as “undesirables” or questioning the effect immigrants have on the country, it is still an intensely debated topic. FDU held its own debate on immigration on Nov. 5, for the second Hot Topics event of the semester.

Gary Darden, associate professor and chair of the Department of Social Sciences and History, moderated the event. He in- troduced the three panelists and said that “the topic is one that is contentious with strong arguments on both sides.”
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Cafeteria to open at 9 a.m. on Saturdays for breakfast

CHRISTI PEACE
News Editor

The school cafeteria is the place where many resident students get their food. Throughout the years, students have requested changes and improvements to the cafeteria, from food quality to hours of operation. On Oct. 30, the Student Government Association succeeded in changing one of those aspects by getting the opening time on Saturday mornings moved to 9 a.m. from 11:30 a.m.

For over a year, the SGA attempted to have weekend hours made earlier. As Tenzin Lama, a senator on the Finance Board of the SGA, explained, students would constantly mention their desire to be able to eat at an earlier time.
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Young FDU alumni offer career advice during panel discussion

CHRISTI PEACE
News Editor

With the U.S. economy suffering for many years, jobs have become more and more difficult to attain. For recent graduates looking to find careers in their chosen fields, being released into the job market without prior experience, advice or connections can make it all the more difficult. On Oct. 10, a panel of FDU alumni provided insight and stories of personal experience with the jobs they have held.

Although the panelists were all communication studies majors with mostly related careers, much of the advice they shared was relevant to all majors – really anyone who is or will be seeking a job.
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Panel discusses America’s ‘red line’ policy toward Syria

CHRISTI PEACE
News Editor

Between the use of chemical weapons against the Syrian people by their own government and the U.S. government debating a potential strike on Syria, it is hard to fully understand the complex situation. With the first Hot Topics event of the semester, three professors explained the history of the region, including recent events that led to the current conflict, and the U.S. foreign policy toward Syria.

The moderator of the event was Geoffrey Weinman, dean of Becton College. He began the event by explaining that the conflict surrounding Syria has many factors and factions connected with it, including groups such as Al Qaeda and countries such as Saudi Arabia, Russia, France and the U.S. Recently, the international community has debated what should be done about the possible use of chemical weapons by Syrian President Bashar al-Assad’s regime.
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Review: ‘The Bridge’ surprises with complex characters, stories

CHRISTI PEACE
News Editor

This July, the channel that produced shows such as “Sons of Anarchy” and “American Horror Story” released its new drama, “The Bridge.” Although the main plot is about law enforcement trying to catch a serial killer, it is not your usual procedural cop show.

For starters it puts two different countries’ police departments together to collaborate on a case involving a body that was placed directly on the border of the bridge separating the U.S. and Mexico.

The show stars Diane Kruger. She plays an unusual, by-the-book detective named Sonya Cross, who has a difficult time relating to others. She normally works alone, as a result of her personality that many of her El Paso PD co-workers find off-putting. It is only her patient and understanding lieutenant who defends her and gives her advice. It is when the body is found that Cross encounters a Mexican detective by the name of Marco Ruiz. Unlike Cross, he is a likeable, married man who shows compassion when dealing with others. This is exemplified right from the start when he allows a woman and her sick husband to cross over the bridge to get to a hospital on the American side. Cross herself had stubbornly told them they couldn’t, as it could disturb the crime scene.
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‘Project 250’ organizes cleanup of Rockaway River with colleges

CHRISTI PEACE
News Editor

On Sept. 18, an email was sent out to FDU students about an upcoming volunteer opportunity.

“Project 250” will take place on Sept. 28 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.

This event will be a collaboration of six schools to clean up Rockaway River and its surrounding land in Denville, N.J.

The project is run by the Catholic Campus Ministry (CCM), which is a student club at the College at Florham as well as several other schools. The group holds events nearly every day, as well as at least one service project per month.
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Free newspapers no longer provided on Florham campus

SHELBY WILSON
AND CHRISTI PEACE
Staff Writers

This semester, those looking to catch up on the news each morning will find that the newspapers once provided for free to students and staff members on the College at Florham campus are nowhere to be found.

The subscriptions to the The New York Times, The Star-Ledger and USA Today have not been renewed.

FDU used to provide the free newspapers Monday through Friday for anyone at the school to take and read.
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‘The New Devils Project’ at FDU creates programs for freshmen

CHRISTI PEACE
News Editor

The task of transitioning into freshman year is one filled with new experiences as well as obstacles to overcome.

Several students and staff members decided that they wanted to find a way to help freshmen with this undertaking by holding events once a week with both entertaining and educational purposes.“The New Devils Project” is a group that does just that.

Danushi Fernando, the Campus Life Coordinator at FDU, pitched the idea to RA Chris Trautman, who agreed with the proposal.

Trautman and another student, Emily Moratti, worked together to make Fernando’s idea come to life. For example, Moratti created a Facebook page to get the information out about the group. Additionally, the pair collaborated over the summer to come up with topics for discussion and find panelists to participate in the events.

Each event is discussion-based with seating in a circle formation, as the intent is to be interactive rather than intimidating or like a classroom.

Panelists who lead the discussions may be teachers and faculty members, but are usually students. Trautman said the reason for the student panelists is because “students learn from students.”

They felt upperclassmen would be able to give insight into the freshmen experience, having recently been through it themselves. Many different subjects, relating to freshman year and college life in general, will be addressed at each event.

Some of the themes include roommate conflict, alcohol awareness, how to cook “devilishly good” food in the cafeteria, and what exactly constitutes sexual consent vs. sexual harassment.

However, as the semester continues, topics may turn to more national and global is- sues, such as the events of Sept. 11, that will “impact (students) on a deeper level.” The desire is for students to become more aware of college life, FDU and, more importantly, themselves.

As Trautman explained, when he and Moratti came up with topics, they kept in mind “what we wish we were told as freshmen.” Each event will have different activities and conversations, and may sometimes include humorous skits that demonstrate specific situations.

The first event was on the subject of happiness. Lona Whitmarsh of the Psychology Department and Sarah B. Azavedo, the Student Life Coordinator, were the speakers.

They spoke about how to be happy, to try to get students “in the right mindset” for the beginning of the year.

Trautman and Fernando said the group is unlike any other at FDU and even many other colleges.

It is unique in that it is almost entirely student-run (with support from Campus Life) and it is geared towards freshmen. The events are free and have mainly student speakers helping out their fellow pupils with a wide variety of issues, some being FDU-specific.

They also said the group is important because the more involved students are, the happier and more productive they will be.

The group was explained to freshmen in their Freshman Seminar classes, and counts toward their outside credit required for the class, where they must attend a certain number of school events and write a little about the experience.

However, although the events are geared towards freshmen, all students are welcome to attend.

If the project is successful, they hope to continue it in future semesters and get more students to be involved (whether attending, speaking as panelists or helping in some other way).

For this first semester, events will take place every Wednesday from 8 to 9 p.m. in the Twombly Lounge.