"News is the first rough draft of history."

The Voice of the College at Florham

"News is the first rough draft of history." - The Voice of the College at Florham

Panel discussion gives insight into Islam

LUCILA SPARKES
Advertising Manager

The term “Muslim” is used to describe a religion, not a culture. This was one of the many topics highlighted in the Orangerie on May 2 as part of the panel discussion titled “Unveiled and Unimaginable? Uncovering and Discovering the Ways Islam is Lived.”

The discussion, which was moderated by Kenneth Sammond, senior lecturer in the Department of Literature, Language, Writing and Philosophy and associate director of the Honors Program, included four panelists. They were Fakhruddin Ahmed, member of the Islamic Society of New Jersey; Reza Aslan, associate professor of creative writing at University of California, Riverside; Titi Kazeem, member of Jam-e-Masjid Islamic Center in Boonton, N.J.; and Sana Mohayya, junior at Fairleigh Dickinson University.
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FDU community hosts tribute for Professor Richard J. Turick

Photo by Lucila Sparkes. The Turick family thanks everyone for their support.

Photo by Lucila Sparkes. The Turick family thanks everyone for their support.


LUCILA SPARKES
Advertising Manager

“When we gathered last time we gathered in shock and sadness, but tonight we are gathering in celebration…in celebration for Rich,” Becton College Dean Geoffrey Weinman said, setting the tone for the two-hour tribute to Richard J. Turick that took place on April 20 in the Dreyfuss Theater.

Turick was a faculty member in the Visual and Performing Arts Department at the College at Florham campus for 22 years. After spending 13 years with the university, he was named department chair and helped build the department to its current standard of excellence.
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Computer graphics class designs posters for animal abuse awareness

Photo courtesy of Janet O’Neil. Some of the students in Professor O’Neil’s course who created posters for Sammy.

Photo courtesy of Janet O’Neil.
Some of the students in Professor O’Neil’s course who created posters for Sammy.


LUCILA SPARKES
Advertising Manager

Janet O’Neil, associate professor in the visual and performing arts deparment, was one of the many New Jersey residents who watched as the story unfolded about the 13-year-old cocker spaniel named Sammy who was abused by his owners.

According to New Jersey Channel 12 News, “Keith E. Morgan and Shauna Ewing Morgan brought Sammy to a Tinton Falls animal shelter claiming they found him on the side of a road in Wall Township. Police later discovered that the dog was reportedly registered to the couple in 2007. They both now face several animal cruelty charges.”

O’Neil, who felt compelled to help Sammy, as well as other neglected animals, had her students create posters to raise awareness about animal cruelty.
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‘Girl Rising’ raises awareness of women’s education in the world

LUCILA SPARKES
Advertising Manager

On April 4, “Girl Rising” was shown in Lenfell Hall at the College at Florham. The film, directed by Academy Award nominee Richard Robbins, is a tool the United Nations uses to alert the general population that educating women is positive for any culture.

The idea of the film stemmed from women around the globe who are being killed in the midst of trying to receive an education.
Before the screening of the film, Joan Desilets, professor of physical education and health, discussed a way to provide direct relief to the women of Africa through an organization called AfricAid. It is a project where Desilets makes jewelry and uses proceeds from the sales to help young women in Africa receive an education.

College senior Nate King expressed his enthusiasm. “She makes the jewelry herself and all the proceeds go to AfricAid. She is very involved and she comes up with unique ideas in her charity involvement and educational commitment,” he said.
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FDU Hell Radio finds ways to increase its ratings

Photo by Lucila Sparkes. John Cahill and Ursula Amatrudo treat the station to a fresh coat of paint.

Photo by Lucila Sparkes.
John Cahill and Ursula Amatrudo treat the station to a fresh coat of paint.


LUCILA SPARKES
Advertising Manager

The next generation of radio is here at the College at Florham.

Through remodeling the station’s space, restructuring its shows and integrating with social media, members of FDU Hell Radio are determined to revamp it with style.

Sophomores John Cahill and Ursula Amatrudo are spearheading the radio’s revamp with many supporters and advocates. The two were inspired by their radio professor John McDermott’s words: “It takes dedication. It takes initiative. And just do it.”

As communication studies majors, Cahill and Amatrudo quickly discovered their love of radio. Cahill expressed his enjoyment of speaking on air while Amatrudo confidently spoke of her desire to make a career out of radio broadcasting. By taking practical applications from class, Amatrudo said she and Cahill envisioned different ways to improve the radio.
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Poet Reginald Gaines joins FDU for reading and poetry workshop

LUCILA SPARKES
Advertising Manager

On Feb. 27, as part of Black History Month, the Black History Month Committee and Creative Writing Department hosted a poetry workshop session and reading with poet Reginald Gaines in the Mansion.

Gaines began the first portion of the event, which was held in Room 13 of the Mansion, by reciting poetry from various 20th century works. After reciting some works that the audience did not necessarily recognize he began to rap “99 Problems” by Jay-Z. Gaines explained how he felt hip-hop is a form of poetry.


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Hip Hop Around the World event welcomes Negros Americanos

LUCILA SPARKES
Advertising Manager

Hip hop is not just a combination of words thrown to a matching beat.

On Feb. 13, the Social Sciences and History Department, the sisters of Phi Sigma Sigma and the Black History Month Committee hosted “Hip Hop Around The World” in Twombly Lounge as part of this year’s Black History Month festivities.

After a half-hour delay due to projection issues, the president of Phi Sigma Sigma, Brittany Coleman, introduced the faculty-based panel. Robert Houle, associate professor of history, began the discussion by explaining how hip hop is prevalent in many different countries and numerous languages.

Houle gave a brief history of how the African culture helped develop hip hop.

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Following debates, Giurastante elected new College at Florham SGA president

Showing good sportsmanship before the debate, Katelyn Lewis (left) and Gina Giurastante (right) shake hands.


LUCILA SPARKES
Advertising Manager

Last week, Gina Giurastante won the presidency of the Student Government Association.
Before the votes were counted, the SGA hosted a debate on Nov. 15 featuring Giurastante and her opponent, Katelyn Lewis, both juniors.
The two discussed issues that affect many students on the College at Florham campus, including tuition costs, club and organizational involvement and their proposed presidential plans.

Giurastante began by explaining that she felt qualified because she is currently a Resident Assistant and has many connections from this experience. She also believes that she works well with the current vice presidents.

Lewis, on the other hand, began by explaining to the audience how she is a chemistry major and has been involved with SGA since her freshman year. Lewis helped create a program with the library called “Studying Pays Off” and through her years of experience, she has gained connections with important FDU faculty.
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Review: Taylor Swift’s ‘Red,’ successful album of heartbreak

LUCILA SPARKES
Advertising Manager

One cannot deny that Taylor Swift is a music phenomenon when, two days after releasing her new album, “Red,” she sold half a million albums.

When announcing her new album on Aug. 13, Swift reiterated many times that this was going to be her saddest album to date. What she did not mention is that this album also would contain more pop elements, including auto tune and a steady noticeable bass beat.

If you don’t like listening to albums that focus on heartbreak, skip the first ten tracks. However, these first ten songs were probably the best written songs of Swift’s young career.

The title track, “Red” paints a vivid picture of a love that was filled with intense passion and emotion only to end abruptly. She uses the metaphor of colors to express feelings of love, anger and sadness.

Armed with heartbreak and raw emotion, Swift brought back her old co-writer from previous albums, Liz Rose, for her most emotional song on the album, “All Too Well.” She incorporates the country genre in her songwriting by telling the story of going to a boyfriend’s sister’s house and leaving her scarf. She chronicles the mutual feelings of love and now that it’s over, it’s painful to remember it all too well.
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‘Harry Potter’ author stops in New York on tour for new book

LUCILA SPARKES
Advertising Manager

The conversations among excited groups of individuals slowly changed into overpowering chants and screams as world renowned author J.K. Rowling entered the stage at the H. Koch Theater at Lincoln Center in New York City.

On Oct. 16, the Little Brown and Company publishing house promoted Rowling’s new book, “The Casual Vacancy,” as part of her three-leg book tour. This stop was her only stop in her North America.

Aiding Rowling was novelist and bookstore owner Ann Patchett, who hosted an “intimate” conversation where more than 2,500 fans were present.

Patchett began by expressing her admiration and excitement for being in the presence of Rowling, a sentiment that led to cheers. When Patchett told Rowling how she single-handedly changed a generation of reading, Rowling could not accept such praise, saying, “This is way too much responsibility.”
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