"News is the first rough draft of history."

The Voice of the College at Florham

"News is the first rough draft of history." - The Voice of the College at Florham

Concerns raised about presidential appointment

MELANIE ANZIDEI
Editor-in-Chief

The recent selection of Sheldon Drucker as Fairleigh Dickinson University’s seventh president was a surprise to the FDU community – for some it was a pleasant one; for others it was a questionable one.

Drucker, who has been serving the university for 17 years, took on the role of interim president of the university after the former president, the late J. Michael Adams, announced his retirement. Drucker was not considered a candidate in the presidential search process, but was chosen to be the university’s next president on April 23.
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From the editor’s desk: Graduating seniors ready to do great things

MELANIE ANZIDEI
Editor-in-Chief

One of my editors asked me, “Do you think that our newspaper is a good one?”
I hesitated a moment before I answered.

In that moment, I knew exactly where he was coming from. How could we, as a staff, be proud of the newspaper that we’re not sure other people even recognized? Of course people know we have a newspaper, but it’s hard to tell with the overflowing issues that are piled in the NAB.

In that moment, which probably only lasted a second or two, I realized that this idea of being proud of this newspaper is something that reflects my entire four years at this university.

For four years, I crept in shadows.
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Sheldon Drucker named Fairleigh Dickinson University’s new president

Photo courtesy of Dan Landau. Former interim president, Sheldon Drucker, named FDU’s seventh president.

Photo courtesy of Dan Landau. Former interim president, Sheldon Drucker, named FDU’s seventh president.


MELANIE ANZIDEI
Editor-In-Chief

On April 23, Sheldon Drucker, who most recently served as the university’s acting and interim president as well as its Chief Operating Officer, was named Fairleigh Dickinson University’s seventh president.

The decision was made after an extensive nationwide and almost year-long search by the Presidential Committee, which was led by Board Vice Chair Robert Hallenbeck and consisted of various members of the FDU community, as reported by The Pillar.
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From the editor’s desk: Change might distract some, inspire others

MELANIE ANZIDEI
Editor-In-Chief

In the words of one of my favorite bands, Envy On The Coast: “No, I’m not afraid, at least not to die. I’m afraid to live and not remember why.”

EOTC couldn’t have put it any better. And, quite frankly, that verse from their song “Lapse” has become a phrase I’ve learned to live by.

We all know that life has its purpose.

Some of us find that purpose a lot sooner than others and it’s a damn shame that others may go their whole lives not knowing what that purpose was.

I’m convinced that the only thing standing between us and our purpose in life is ourselves. We stand as our own ironic distraction to our own happiness.

Too many of us are afraid of the inevitable, of the obstacles that get in the way of finding our purpose. Sometimes, we get so distracted by letdowns and setbacks that we forget an obstacle never means the end of the world. It might just mean a different world where we start seeing things differently – and that’s okay. Change is constant; change is good. Like obstacles, change is inevitable. So is death, and we can’t be afraid of that.

I don’t think we should be afraid of anything, but if we were afraid of something it should be living our whole lives not knowing that life’s worth living. And we can only know that life is worth living when we find our purpose – when we realize exactly what it is that keeps us waking up every morning.

This thing I call purpose changes. What made our lives worth living at the age of 2, 10 or 20 years old will be different from the thing that makes life worth living when we’re 40, 60 or even 80 years old. For example, when we’re toddlers, everything makes our day: playing with a toy truck; blowing a dandelion; speeding down a slide. When we’re that young, it’s hard not to find something that fascinates us. It might just be that the world is a large place that we’re progressively discovering and the route of discovery is a child’s purpose.

As we grow older, unfortunately, our world seems to shrink. Things that once amused us don’t anymore. Some of us, in a sense, become jaded along the way. Others start finding purpose in other things. Maybe it’s something we love to do like playing the guitar, playing soccer or even going to school. We stick with that thing we love, and for a while it becomes our purpose, too.

This purpose keeps changing. One day it can be getting into our dream school or making the winning goal in a soccer game, and other days it could be seeing the smile on our niece’s face. One day it will be seeing the smile on a newborn’s face or our future wife or husband. Our purpose changes, and it’s supposed to.

The truth is that life is filled with exciting chapters that we should be excited to write. We should be grateful to even be able to turn that page.

My point is that we can’t go our whole lives pretending to be happy. We have to find happiness in whatever makes us… happy. Some people seem to complicate happiness and try to force it. But, you can’t do that, either.

Those 17 little words from EOTC could mean 17 different things to 17 different people. But, to me, they mean one thing. They mean that you can’t live your life on autopilot. You should always be doing something you love, and if you’re not, then change it. The only person standing between you the thing you love is you.

Change is inevitable, but we can control it.

From the editor’s desk: Ready to graduate?

MELANIE ANZIDEI
Editor-in-Chief

For the past four years, I have been preparing myself for May 21. I know I’m not alone when I say that.

Being a senior has opened my eyes to a world I never knew existed. I mean, I knew it was there, but I never knew what it looked it or how it’d make me feel. For the past eight months I’ve grown from a scared, young girl into the woman that’s ready for the next big step – graduating college.
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Essay: I still call it ‘home,’ even though I’m never there

MELANIE ANZIDEI
Editor-in-Chief

I hate when this happens.

“Where am I? I always do this,” I spoke aloud to what appeared to be an empty room. I looked around to confirm that the silence was in fact from the lack of an audience rather than their lack of caring about whatever words I spoke.

I opened and closed my eyes repeatedly as if doing so would bring me back to my own bed.

After a few more squints and a tearful yawn, I started to realize where I was. The bed sheets were familiar. Then, he walked in.
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Rockstars collaborate with rappers – phase or permanent?

MELANIE ANZIDEI
Editor-in-Chief

The first CD I ever bought (besides “Now That’s What I Call Music,” remember those?) was Blink-182’s Greatest Hits album in 2005.

That CD, though bootleg, was my golden ticket into the world of rock-n-roll. The genre, back then, was filled with all sorts of rock, from crappy-punk to screamo to Christian.

Rock-n-roll basically had no limits, which is why I instantly grew to love all that is rock. However, I never thought I’d live to see the day when the rockstars I fell in love with collaborated with some of my favorite rappers.

And, for starters, I kind of love it.

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From the editor’s desk: From a resident to a commuter

MELANIE ANZIDEI
Editor-in-Chief

When my not-so-glamorous life is broken down into tasks, I start to wonder how I haven’t gone insane.

Bear with me: 1. Monday: wake up; take bus to New York City; intern; take bus home; drive to FDU; go to meeting; work on newspaper layout; drive home. 2. Tuesday: wake up; drive to FDU; go to class; drive home. 3. Wednesday: wake up; drive to FDU; go to class; go to meeting; go home. 4. Thursday: wake up; drive to FDU; go to class; drive home. 5. Friday: wake up; take bus to NYC; intern; take bus home. 6. Saturday: SLEEP. 7. Sunday: wake up; drive to FDU; work on layout; drive home. 8. Repeat.

Part of me wants to run in the opposite direction when I think of this semester and all the things that come with it, while another part of me can’t wait to say, “I did it,” when it’s all over.

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Search for FDU’s new president continues

MELANIE ANZIDEI
Editor-in-Chief

Fairleigh Dickinson University is currently in the process of finding the perfect candidate to take on the role as the university’s next president.

The search, which is being conducted by the FDU Presidential Search Committee and assisted by the firm of R. William Funk & Associates, began in the fall of 2012 and is expected to be completed by this spring.

The committee “has been formed with 14 representatives from a wide breadth of university constituencies, including the Board of Trustees, faculty, administration, students and alumni,” according to fdu.edu.

All constituencies of the university expressed similar expectations for the new president, said Robert Hallenback, chair of the Presidential Search Committee.
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