"News is the first rough draft of history."

The Voice of the College at Florham

"News is the first rough draft of history." - The Voice of the College at Florham

Review: Halsey’s ‘New Americana’ leads a music revolution


It seems that today’s pop radio is filled with electronic beats, auto-tuned voices and cookie-cutter lyrics. A lot of the lyrics in songs have been devoid of meaning, and the lyrics that have meaning are overlooked by listeners.

Halsey is an up-and-coming singer/songwriter from New Jersey who has recently made waves throughout pop radio with her song “New Americana.” Continue reading

NBC’s ‘Hannibal’: The meal that ended too soon


In June, NBC cancelled what some would call the most stunning and brilliantly shot show on television. Despite its enriched dialogue and beautiful cinematography, “Hannibal” only lasted three short seasons on network television.

The reason NBC gave for canceling “Hannibal” was due to its low ratings in the Saturday at 10 p.m. time slot. However, looking back at this past season, “Hannibal” trended high every week on Twitter when the episodes aired, and went out with a bang with its season finale being number one in the Nielsen’s Twitter TV Ratings, trending until the next day. Continue reading

Review: Blomkamp’s ‘Chappie’ is flawed, but still enjoyable

Entertainment Editor

Neill Blomkamp is one of the more interesting sci-fi directors out there.

Beginning in 2009 with his breakout debut feature, “District 9,” the South African director has become a unique voice among science fiction directors. His films have action, but are usually accompanied by some kind of deeper social meaning. “District 9” was about apartheid with aliens while “Elysium” was about the 99% versus the 1%.

This brings us to Blomkamp’s third feature as a director, “Chappie.” Continue reading

Review: ‘Kingsman’ an absolute blast from start to finish

Entertainment Editor

What do you get when you mix the director of films such as “Kick Ass,” “Layer Cake” and “X-Men: First Class” with the spy action movie genre?
A pretty entertaining film, as it turns out.

“Kingsman: The Secret Service,” based off of the comic book entitled “The Secret Service” by Mark Millar, focuses on young Eggsy (newcomer Taron Edgerton), a delinquent who, after getting into trouble with the law as well as his abusive stepfather, contacts the mysterious Harry Hart (Colin Firth). Continue reading

Review: Cumberbatch a good ‘Imitation’ of Alan Turing

Entertainment Editor

It never ceases to amaze me how good some people are with numbers. I was never great at math or numbers in general (I am a communication studies major after all), so I am always surprised when people use numbers to great effect and are able to solve complicated problems after some time or with relative ease.

Pair the story of one of the greatest mathematicians in the world with a potential Oscar-winning cast and story, and you have a great idea on your hands.

“The Imitation Game” focuses on the life of brilliant mathematician Alan Turing, played by Benedict Cumberbatch. In the midst of World War II, he attempted and (considering this is a true story, this is not a spoiler), eventually succeeded in decrypting and breaking the Nazi Enigma Machine. The machine carried out secret messages from the Nazis that contained military secrets. Continue reading

Review: Formula One movie ‘Rush’ lands cast and crew in winner’s circle

Jon Scott
Film Critic

It’s that time of the year again. The summer movie season of 2013 has officially been put to rest and now it’s time for the more serious, Oscar-potential fall films to take the spotlight. We’ve already seen some of those potentials pass by (such as the recent “Prisoners”). But now it’s Ron Howard’s turn. Howard returns to the big screen with his latest film, “Rush.”

The film chronicles the intense rivalry between Formula One racing drivers James Hunt (played by the God of Thunder himself, Chris Hemsworth) and Niki Lauda (Daniel Bruhl) that took place in the 1976 racing season. During one of the races, Lauda gets into a horrible accident that leaving his face severely burned. However, six weeks after the accident, Lauda gets back into the driver’s seat and continues to pursue Hunt for the championship. The film shows how intense the rivalry was between the two and how each had entirely different, clashing personalities. While Hunt is a loud, obnoxious, partying driver who believes every day could be your last so you might as well live it up to its fullest, Lauda is the exact opposite. He’s cold, calculating and always strategizing how he will drive the next race. He sees everything as math which he believes makes you the better driver. The film showcases their rivalry as well as their lives off the track.
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Review: ‘The Bridge’ surprises with complex characters, stories

News Editor

This July, the channel that produced shows such as “Sons of Anarchy” and “American Horror Story” released its new drama, “The Bridge.” Although the main plot is about law enforcement trying to catch a serial killer, it is not your usual procedural cop show.

For starters it puts two different countries’ police departments together to collaborate on a case involving a body that was placed directly on the border of the bridge separating the U.S. and Mexico.

The show stars Diane Kruger. She plays an unusual, by-the-book detective named Sonya Cross, who has a difficult time relating to others. She normally works alone, as a result of her personality that many of her El Paso PD co-workers find off-putting. It is only her patient and understanding lieutenant who defends her and gives her advice. It is when the body is found that Cross encounters a Mexican detective by the name of Marco Ruiz. Unlike Cross, he is a likeable, married man who shows compassion when dealing with others. This is exemplified right from the start when he allows a woman and her sick husband to cross over the bridge to get to a hospital on the American side. Cross herself had stubbornly told them they couldn’t, as it could disturb the crime scene.
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Review: Wecker brings ‘Old New York’ to life with first book

Student Voice Editor

Helene Wecker’s debut novel “The Golem and the Jinni,” takes readers back to a period in New York’s history when “whole nations are packed into the space of a few blocks,” with a supernatural twist.

The novel takes place in the fading gaslight world of nineteenth century New York, a period when thousands upon thousands people poured into cities of cramped tenements and sweatshops, all looking to secure the promise that was America. The setting proves to be the backdrop of a sweeping story revolving around the arrival of two supernatural creatures, themselves strangers in a strange land where even for them nothing is what it seems.

The Golem, Chava, which means life in Hebrew, arrives in New York from Danzig after being created by the mystical and devious Yehudah Schaalman by the dark Kabbalistic arts.
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